How Emotions Trump Thinking

by Network for Good Specialist ‎04-22-2014 3:00 AM, EDT

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

Brainiac's Guide to Cause MarketingAs many of you know, the key to cause marketing is appealing to your consumers’ emotions. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, The Brainiac’s Guide to Cause Marketing, by Katya Andresen. In this guide, Katya outlines why feelings trump logical thinking, drive people to donate, and increase the impact of your cause campaign. Check it out!

 

 

Emotion, above all else, galvanizes people to act. People support causes because they feel something, not because they think something. In fact, if you make people stop and think, they tend to do less good.

 

Because people give from an emotional place, giving literally feels good.

 

David Leonhardt, in his New York Times Magazine article “What Makes People Give?,” points out that this is good news because it means philanthropy is not a zero-sum game. If giving were rational, we’d give less when we heard other big donations were happening. Instead, we have an urge to join forces with a cause.

 

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By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

As many of you know, the key to cause marketing is appealing to your consumers’ emotions. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, The Brainiac’s Guide to Cause Marketing, by Katya Andresen. In this guide, Katya explains why people act when cause marketing campaigns are personal. Check it out!

 

P&G 1=1A few years ago, Proctor & Gamble launched a cause-related marketing campaign in South Africa called “1 Pack = 1 Vaccine.”

 

For every pack of diapers sold, a child was vaccinated against tetanus. It was wildly successful, boosting Pampers sales and resulting in 150 million vaccines.

 

A rival campaign didn’t fare as well. Its slogan was less tangible, not to mention wordy: “1 pack will help eradicate newborn tetanus globally.” Meh.

 

Unfortunately, as this example from researchers Cynthia Cryder and George Loewenstein illustrates all too well, marketers often talk about causes in intangible terms, and that doesn’t work very well. The vast majority of good causes have messaging closer to the failed campaign. And that’s a very tangible problem.

 

Why do marketers need to get as tangible as the “1 Pack = 1 Vaccine” message?

 

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Enabling Social Employee Engagement

by Network for Good Specialist ‎04-09-2014 3:00 AM, EDT

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

The human resources world is always on the lookout for creative ways to engage, recruit, and retain employees. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, Employee Engagement: 5 Trends Shaping Employee Social Impact Programs, by Kate Olsen. In this guide, Kate unpacks ideas emerging from different sectors, all with the same theme: creative ways to activate your workforce with cause. Check it out!

 

Employee engagement and social sharing go together like peanut butter and jelly. It’s easy to recruit employees that are already active in the community to join your company’s cause programs. But how do you get the next wave of employees to sign up? And the next? That’s when social proof and storytelling come into play.

 

Engaging Employees Socially The best ambassadors for your cause portfolio are the employees actively engaged in your programs. Equip those employees to tell their personal story about why they care, how they help, and what it means to be able to do it alongside other employees. When others hear the passion and see the powerful impact results, they will be clamoring to be a part of your company’s do-gooding efforts.

 

Storytelling can take many forms. Here are a few suggestions to help your employees share the call to action to get involved and make a difference:

 

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Why We Relate to Sea Monkeys

by Network for Good Specialist ‎04-02-2014 3:00 AM, EDT

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

As many of you know, the key to cause marketing is appealing to your consumers’ emotions. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, The Brainiac’s Guide to Cause Marketing, by Katya Andresen. In this guide, Katya explains why people act when cause marketing campaigns are personal. Check it out!

 

 

The closer we feel to a cause—and the closer we believe a company is to a cause—the more likely we are to act.

 

When it comes to problems, the bigger the numbers, the smaller our concern. The more who die, the less we care. And one girl in need matters more than millions.

 

Humans’ inability to act in the face of massive numbers, according to researcher Paul Slovic, is a phenomenon called “physic numbing.” But the issue isn’t just an inability to handle a large scale. Once you get past one person—or animal, for that matter—empathy declines.

 

Sea MonkeysA researcher into this phenomenon was inspired to study this effect further when his daughter’s classroom had an aquarium filled with sea monkeys (which are actually just brine shrimp).

 

The researcher noted that the sea monkeys kept dying off until only one little sea monkey was left. No one seemed to care until there was only the one sea monkey left floating. The children, who had viewed the crowded tank as an undifferentiated mass, became hugely devoted to the last sea monkey. They described its personality and cared deeply about its survival, though its brethren’s deaths had barely raised an eyebrow.

 

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Employee Engagement Gone Mobile

by Network for Good Specialist ‎03-25-2014 3:00 AM, EDT

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

As many of you know, employee engagement is an ever-evolving trend. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, Employee Engagement: 5 Trends Shaping Employee Social Impact Programs, by Kate Olsen. In this guide, Kate unpacks ideas emerging from different sectors, all with the same theme: creative ways to activate your workforce. Check it out!

 

Employee Engagement Trend: Mobile Access

 

Mobile engagement is keyAmy Chait, Head of Market Development for YourCause, asserts that employee engagement is going mobile. Employees are hungry for ways to opt-in to volunteer programs, make donations, and monitor personal impact via their smart phones. This is particularly true for companies with a large portion of the workforce consistently on the road.

 

As Amy notes, “Our clients continually talk about how their employees are out in the field and not in front of a computer most of the time, therefore mobile access will help support participation for all types of workforce roles.” Just as individuals can manage their social networks, calendars and email via phone, so too do they want to be able to manage everything else on the go.

 

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By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

We’re pleased to share our newest guide sponsored by Quantum WorkplaceEngaging Millennial Employees: Recruit and Retain Top Talent with Cause. Here’s an excerpt:

 

Quantum Workplace Millennial employee quoteGeneration Y has been imbued with a sense of responsibility. Millennials feel responsible for themselves, their neighbors (both virtual and physical), their communities, and their planet. They grew up learning the importance of recycling and using less water, and that their actions directly affect their communities. In return, they believe that companies—their employers—have a responsibility to them, their society, and the world.

 

Although they acknowledge the bottom line, they also believe that companies need to give back some of what they’ve earned to contribute to the greater good. They see smart ways for companies to do this, too, such as transparency in reporting, sustainable business practices, and using company products and services for good. According to Jay Gilbert in the Ivey Business Journal, the single biggest threat to Millennial employee retention is a company’s reputation. Why is this so important?

 

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Winning with Millennial Employees

by Network for Good Specialist ‎01-31-2014 3:00 AM, EST

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

Millennial Guide - coverFrequently cited as flaky and narcissistic, Millennial employees actually have multiple positive traits that can act as a boon to your brand. When leveraged correctly, the generation’s affinity with cause and tech savvy directly relate to your company’s recruitment and retention strategies.

 

We're pleased to share our new eGuide, Engaging Millennial Employees, that explores these techniques and provides you with the tools to recruit and retain top talent.

 

Here are two ways to win with Millennial employees:

 

1) Loyalty to Responsible Brands

The reputation of your brand is of utmost importance. study on Millennials and the workplace found that when a company’s reputation suffers, so does employee morale.

In fact, it found that “employer reputation is the most frequent engagement threat.” A reputable brand, however, gives employees bragging rights and increases loyalty. If you want employees to be your ardent supporters, keep up the charitable work.

 

Recruitment Strategy: Think Like Tory Burch

As the fashion company interviewed potential employees, they realized a funny thing: Interviewees were drawn to the company’s cause work.

 

“[Our philanthropic work] is attracting amazing talent. When we interview people, one of the first things they bring up is the [Tory Burch] Foundation. They bring it up. We don’t. And that’s really exciting.” – Tory Burch

 

Try it! Incorporate charity into your company’s hiring posts. Note what giving opportunities exist and why.

 

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By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

Too loud via PinterestRibbons, promises to “do good”, and certifications saturate an already noisy consumer-focused marketplace. Consumers can be overwhelmed—fatigued, in fact—when there are too many messages and they all sound the same.

 

Cone’s newest Social Impact Study: The Next Cause Evolution explains how companies can break out from the norm by demonstrating impact and showcasing business transparency.

 

Ways you can do this right now:

 

  • Give charity to your customers. Let them choose a cause of their choice and relate that affinity to your brand.

 

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By Kate Olsen | @Kate4Good

 

What is a Social Good Campaign graphic.jpgThe rise of social media usage coupled with decline of trust in corporate America gave companies the option to increasingly turn to new online cause marketing initiatives – social good campaigns – to drive consumer interest, link their brands to charity and counterbalance negative PR about social harms that arise as a cost of doing business. 

 

Companies use social good campaigns to create a halo effect for their brand with their customers and thereby “do well by doing good,” as the old adage goes.

 

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By Kate Olsen | @Kate4Good & Allison McGuire | @Calimcg

 

Consumers in the age of social media can smell disingenuous cause marketing a mile away. Plus, they now have the tools to broadcast the bad (and the good) with every share, tweet, and pin.

 

Greenwashing via PinterestThe consequences of poorly constructed cause marketing efforts are played out in real-time online and in the media. Watchdog groups like Breast Cancer Action’s Think Before you Pink project and BuyLessCrap.org’s (RED)ICU(LESS) campaign are quick to focus attention on companies that are perceived to put business goals ahead of social impact, especially as their campaigns relate to pink (or green or cause) washing – the act of making false or exaggerated claims that a product or company is socially or environmentally friendly.

 

To ward off any cause marketing backlash, clearly answer the following questions before embarking on your next campaign.

 

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About This Blog


Companies for Good shares insights on cause marketing and corporate social responsibility topics to inform your charitable engagement with consumers and employees. Network for Good empowers corporate partners to unleash generosity and advance good causes. The blog celebrates that work and provides expertise and resources to help you do well and do good. Learn more

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