How Emotions Trump Thinking

by Network for Good Specialist on ‎04-22-2014 3:00 AM, EDT

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

Brainiac's Guide to Cause MarketingAs many of you know, the key to cause marketing is appealing to your consumers’ emotions. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, The Brainiac’s Guide to Cause Marketing, by Katya Andresen. In this guide, Katya outlines why feelings trump logical thinking, drive people to donate, and increase the impact of your cause campaign. Check it out!

 

 

Emotion, above all else, galvanizes people to act. People support causes because they feel something, not because they think something. In fact, if you make people stop and think, they tend to do less good.

 

Because people give from an emotional place, giving literally feels good.

 

David Leonhardt, in his New York Times Magazine article “What Makes People Give?,” points out that this is good news because it means philanthropy is not a zero-sum game. If giving were rational, we’d give less when we heard other big donations were happening. Instead, we have an urge to join forces with a cause.

 

Keep reading...

3 Reasons for Tangible Cause Marketing

by Network for Good Specialist on ‎04-15-2014 3:00 AM, EDT

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

As many of you know, the key to cause marketing is appealing to your consumers’ emotions. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, The Brainiac’s Guide to Cause Marketing, by Katya Andresen. In this guide, Katya explains why people act when cause marketing campaigns are personal. Check it out!

 

P&G 1=1A few years ago, Proctor & Gamble launched a cause-related marketing campaign in South Africa called “1 Pack = 1 Vaccine.”

 

For every pack of diapers sold, a child was vaccinated against tetanus. It was wildly successful, boosting Pampers sales and resulting in 150 million vaccines.

 

A rival campaign didn’t fare as well. Its slogan was less tangible, not to mention wordy: “1 pack will help eradicate newborn tetanus globally.” Meh.

 

Unfortunately, as this example from researchers Cynthia Cryder and George Loewenstein illustrates all too well, marketers often talk about causes in intangible terms, and that doesn’t work very well. The vast majority of good causes have messaging closer to the failed campaign. And that’s a very tangible problem.

 

Why do marketers need to get as tangible as the “1 Pack = 1 Vaccine” message?

 

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Why We Relate to Sea Monkeys

by Network for Good Specialist on ‎04-02-2014 3:00 AM, EDT

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

As many of you know, the key to cause marketing is appealing to your consumers’ emotions. Below is an adapted excerpt from our guide, The Brainiac’s Guide to Cause Marketing, by Katya Andresen. In this guide, Katya explains why people act when cause marketing campaigns are personal. Check it out!

 

 

The closer we feel to a cause—and the closer we believe a company is to a cause—the more likely we are to act.

 

When it comes to problems, the bigger the numbers, the smaller our concern. The more who die, the less we care. And one girl in need matters more than millions.

 

Humans’ inability to act in the face of massive numbers, according to researcher Paul Slovic, is a phenomenon called “physic numbing.” But the issue isn’t just an inability to handle a large scale. Once you get past one person—or animal, for that matter—empathy declines.

 

Sea MonkeysA researcher into this phenomenon was inspired to study this effect further when his daughter’s classroom had an aquarium filled with sea monkeys (which are actually just brine shrimp).

 

The researcher noted that the sea monkeys kept dying off until only one little sea monkey was left. No one seemed to care until there was only the one sea monkey left floating. The children, who had viewed the crowded tank as an undifferentiated mass, became hugely devoted to the last sea monkey. They described its personality and cared deeply about its survival, though its brethren’s deaths had barely raised an eyebrow.

 

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By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG

 

State Farm - Neighborhood Assist - Tool LibraryState Farm’s annual Neighborhood Assist program is a Facebook app that crowdsources the insurance company’s corporate philanthropy. Through individual votes for neighborhoods across North America, State Farm’s social community helps determine which 40 areas receive a $25,000 neighborhood-improvement grant.

 

After accepting over 3,000 online submissions, the State Farm Youth Advisory Board narrows the pool to 200 finalists, then opens up the voting process to determine which causes get grants.

 

We’re excited to feature State Farm’s 2014 program via our interview with Kellie Clapper, State Farm Enterprise Philanthropy AVP.

 

AM: What’s different about this year’s Neighborhood Assist?

KC: We are looking forward to another successful year of Neighborhood Assist. To kick off the program this year, we created short videos, profiling some of last year’s inspirational winners. One shows Kelsy Laird, a volunteer who helped disabled kids experience waterskiing for the first time. Another shows Matt LaLonde who brought his community together with home improvement and gardening tools at no cost. These videos showcased just some of the many great organizations and thousands of worthy people State Farm has touched through Neighborhood Assist. We hope they inspire other organizations to submit their causes as well. 

 

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3 Words to Drive Impact Goals in 2014

by KateNFG ‎01-08-2014 10:50 AM, EST

By Kate Olsen | @Kate4Good

 

FF5E4A9920BD2BD69073451B09DA0_h416_w442_m2_q80_cMHFXwuUe.jpgIt’s resolution time.  Chris Brogan sets New Year’s goals around 3 words that “will become part of the way you identify yourself, and thus, a guiding light for your efforts.” 

 

Here are 3 words to jumpstart your impact goal setting process.  

 
  1. Curate
  2. Prove
  3. Inspire
 

 

 

 

By Allison McGuire | @CaliMcG



While consumers say they prefer brands that give back and support social and environmental causes, sometimes their actions don’t match up to support that idea.

 

Check out Cone’s terrific chart that denotes the gap between ideals and action:

Cone Communications Social Impact Study 2013 - Proclamations v. Actions

What might surprise you is the highest percentage of actions taken to support values is donating.

 

Keep reading...

Drumroll please--we're pleased to bring you the top blog post of 2013. Have a happy new year!

       

#1: State Farm Changes the Game with Neighborhood Assist

 

State Farm is trending. Their new Neighborhood Assist (formerly known as Cause An Effect) Facebook app crowdsources the insurance company’s corporate philanthropy. Through individual votes for neighborhoods all across the U.S. and Canada, State Farm’s social community helps determine which 40 areas receive a $25K neighborhood-improvement grant.

State Farm - Neighborhood Assist kids 

The State Farm Youth Advisory Board accepts 3,000 submissions online, narrows the pool to 200 finalists, then opens the voting process to determine which 40 causes get $25K grants.

  

We had the opportunity to interview Kellie Clapper, Assistant Vice President at State Farm Insurance, who is behind the campaign, and are pleased to share some key insights.

 

Network for Good: What is State Farm most proud of from the 2012 Cause An Effect campaign?

Kellie Clapper: We’re so proud of the extent and diversity of the program’s reach.  In 2012, more than 1.2 million votes were cast in three weeks. The $25,000 grants reached 22 states and 40 communities ranging in size from 222 to eight million. Examples of winning causes ranged from helping an animal shelter replace its rescue van to assisting groups that support the homeless and impoverished. It also proved to a team of young people they really could drive change and make a positive impact.

 

 

 We're pleased to bring you our top 10 blog posts of 2013!

 

#2: 6 STEPPS to Viral Success for Your Cause

 

Contagious - book coverFellow cause marketers, wouldn’t you like a dollar for every time someone told you to ‘make it go viral?’  The beauty and frustration of virality is that you never know what will catch on.  Context, creativity and conversation all have to align to get tens, hundreds or thousands of people to talk about your idea at the same time. 

 

We may not be able to make things go viral by sheer force of will, but Jonah Berger has a few ideas about how to engineer messages and campaigns that are more likely to spread.  Below are a few tips from his new book Contagious: Why Things Catch On.    

 

Jonah outlines six key STEPPS that will transform your cause marketing messages into content that will entertain, inspire and incite people to spread the word.

 

1. Social Currency: How will talking about your campaign affect the sharer’s status in his/her community?  Will it make the sharer look knowledgeable, in the know, generous?

 

Example: Packaging your message in a slick piece of media, such as the documentary Girl Rising, makes it easy for people to recommend – they seem intellectual, generous and pop culture savvy.

 

 

We're pleased to bring you our top 10 blog posts of 2013!

 

#3: Predictions: Cause Marketing in 2013

 

2013-predictionsIn 2013, I see 3 distinct trends emerging in cause marketing that reinforce deeper partnerships among brands, charities, and consumers to create lasting value for all partners. 

 

Marquee Programs

One-off cause marketing programs have their place, but companies are realizing the benefits of investing in a cause marketing platform that evolves year after year.  These marquee programs not only generate more lasting social impact though deeper partnerships with charity partners, but can also create more brand equity through thoughtful and authentic integrated marketing communications. 

 

Example:

The Warner Bros. & DC Entertainment ‘We Can Be Heroes’ campaign (benefitting International Rescue Committee, Mercy Corps and Save the Children) is entering its second year and is integrated across digital, mobile, retail, event and other marketing channels.

 

We're pleased to bring you our top 10 blog posts of 2013!

 

#4: 5 Steps to Get Cause Supporters to ‘Want to’ Vs. ‘Have to’

 

I'm Free via PinterestNir Eyal, who explores life at the intersection of psychology, technology, and business, recently posted a fascinating account of new research on giving behavior. A meta-analysis of several research studies finds that when you add a magic phrase at the end of an appeal you can double the likelihood of getting a ‘yes’ for your cause campaign.

 

What is the magic phrase? It’s ‘but you are free to accept or refuse.’

 

Highlighting the choice people have to support your cause empowers them.  The exchange becomes a proactive decision to help, as opposed to a guilt trip or obligatory, ‘have to’ task.  We learn at a young age that we don’t like being told what to do, and unfortunately, we don’t outgrow our compulsion to avoid the things we feel obligated to do.  

  

Free will is a powerful motivator.  As Nir points out, the phrase ‘but you are free’ neutralizes that compulsion to reject being told what to do.

 

How can you use this lesson to help supporters want to join your cause campaign?

 

 

 


   

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About This Blog


Companies for Good shares insights on cause marketing and corporate social responsibility topics to inform your charitable engagement with consumers and employees. Network for Good empowers corporate partners to unleash generosity and advance good causes. The blog celebrates that work and provides expertise and resources to help you do well and do good. Learn more

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