Secret of Success = Generosity (luck is so last year)

by Network for Good Specialist on ‎07-08-2013 3:00 AM, EDT

By Kate Olsen@Kate4Good

 

The Conference on Volunteering and Service, hosted by Points of Light, convened an incredible line-up of speakers this year. 

 

Adam Grant.jpgOne of my favorite sessions was a lunch presentation called “It's About Science! Unpacking the Relationship between Volunteering, the Brain, and the Body”.  The headline presenter was Adam Grant, tenured management professor at Wharton and author of Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success.  I enjoyed the opportunity to chat with Adam at a small media roundtable event after his presentation.  I’m happy to share key takaways with you here.

 

Think about your reciprocity style at work.  When you sum up your interactions with others, would you consider yourself to be a net taker, matcher or giver? 

 

  • Takers typically try to find a way to benefit themselves in their interactions with others.  These are the narcissists or people who have been burned one too many times in their generous dealings with others.
  • Matchers believe in equitable exchanges: you do something for me and I will do something for you.  It’s more about paying it back than paying it forward.
  • Givers genuinely want to help others succeed and are often looking for ways they can have an impact without thought of evening the score. 

Stay tuned to find out which type of person is likely to be the most successful!

 

 Photo: Adam Grant

 

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Companies for Good shares insights on cause marketing and corporate social responsibility topics to inform your charitable engagement with consumers and employees. Network for Good empowers corporate partners to unleash generosity and advance good causes. The blog celebrates that work and provides expertise and resources to help you do well and do good. Learn more

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